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Truck Best Truck Glass Repair Weatherly PA

We Can Arrive in Just a Couple Hours!

Get our professional technicians at your door within hours for most jobs.

We are regularly in Weatherly or are local so we can resolve your glass repairs very quickly. Our repair trucks are equipped with a wide variety of parts and supplies, making it possible for us to handle repairs on all makes and models of vehicles. We service Weatherly and all surrounding communities in PA.

Our Services

  • Friendly, trustworthy & experienced technicians
  • 24/7 mobile assistance
  • Free consultations
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee
  • Written pricing, up front, no add-ons
  • All makes and models of vehicles
  • We come to your location
  • We work with your insurance company
  • Customer service is our top priority

Weatherly Truck Windshield Repairs

Whenever you're on the long-haul, you don't want to worry about how to get your truck glass repaired. We help many semi truck drivers replace their windshields and windows every year! Our service technicians will have the capacity to service your truck glass promptly. If it can be fixed, we will do that. If the glass must be replaced, we can take care of that also. By providing mobile services, we'll have the ability to send an auto glass expert out to your Weatherly area. Or, if you want to come to our facility, we have a glass repair facility close by. Get more Windshields information here.

Semi Truck Windshield Repairs in Weatherly

While truck's windshields sit higher than a car's, they can not stay clear of rock flying up and causing chip damage. Normally we can repair a small rock chip in your truck's windshield. Repairing the windshield on a semi truck is about the same as doing any other vehicle and our specialists are specialists at the process.

Get your truck back en route today by calling our repair hotline.

Truck Window Replacement PA 18255

Here are some differences between truck glass issues vs. car glass issues.

  • Semi truck drivers are taught to avoid following other big rigs that tend to kick up stones on low-quality highways and roads.
  • Avoidance is key and truck drivers understand that. Because of this, they typically park in protected areas.
  • Your big rig windshield cracks or chips are repaired immediately.

One significant contrast, however, is commercial vehicle insurance. Whenever a truck driver notices a glass issue, they need to get it taken care of immediately. This will keep their truck in really good status with the commercial insurance policy. Click for Window Repair information.

Big rig windshields are constructed to last. Don't let that fool you. Although the glass may be tougher, trucks spend more time driving. For this reason, they are at greater risk of getting chips and cracks in their windshield.

Weatherly Emergency Truck Glass Repairs

When your truck has a broken windshield, door glass or back glass, it is much more than just a hindrance, it is a safety concern. Additionally, the problems may so significant that your truck is not lawfully driveable. We are the best option for all your truck's glass repairs. We offer unexpected emergency service when you need it the most!

Emergency Service You Want!

We are the best glass repair service in #CITY. The repair is performed promptly and our standards are very high. This guarantees that you receive the best repairs on your truck. Your safety is the prime concern. As a result of this, we make certain that your truck is repaired correctly and safely.

Windshield FAQ

Crooked Mechanics Adding Extra Chips On Windshield?
Is It A Common Scam For Crooked Mechanics To Add More Chips On Windshield To Increase The Repair Cost?? My Girlfriend Swears She Only Had One Chip On Her Windshield When She Took Her Car In For A Tint Job And A Windshield Chip Repair Estimate. When She Got Her Car Back 2 Hours Later, She Finds 3 Small Chips That Are Very Unnoticeable If You Don'T Look Closely And Another Chip Not Too Far From The Her Original Chip That She Got Inspected. She Swears The Chips Were Not There Before She Took It Into The Shop And Would Have Noticed At Least The Other Chip Near By While Inspecting Her Windshield If It Was There Beforehand. If It Is A Case Of A Crooked Scam, Is There Anything We Can Do??

It's not very likely. Windshield chips can happen very easily and go unnoticed for days, weeks, months and even years. The person would have to be a genius to place just the right amount of damage so as NOT to crack the entire windshield glass. Glass is HIGHLY unpredictable in what it'll do once it receives an impact from outside forces.

Replacing A Windshield?
Hello, Have A 1992 Ford Explorer And I Need To Replace The Windshield. I Found One At The Salvage Yard. I Figure It Will Be Easy To Get The Old One Out. But Is It Difficult To Install The New One? Thanks

Go to the auto parts store nearest to you and pick up a tube of windshield sealant/glue and a panel remover. (it's like a little crowbar). Use the panel remover to carefully pop off the trim around the windshield, then have at it to get the old one out. Maybe put a tarp or something similar down over the dash to keep any accidental broken glass from making a mess. Clean up the old glue really well, you really want it down to the clean paint before you install the new window. Clean the lip with some solvent or mild detergent once you get all the glass and glue off. Follow the instructions on the tube of sealant as carefully as possible, but basically you'll put a careful bead around the seating lip and you're going to want to have a second person help you *carefully* place the new window into place. Most parts stores and even harbor freight have cheap little suction cups for this, It might be worth getting a pair and messing around with them on some other glass or similar material so you know how to use them without dropping the glass. Once you have it set in place, basically you're going to press it into place, make sure it is centered and square, sealed all around, then you'll wipe up any extra sealer. Then, let it set as the tube directs and re-install the trim. Usually they take a while to fully set up so make sure you don't need to drive it until the time period is up. Best of luck with your replacement!

Any Personal Experience With Noise Blocking Exterior Replacement Windows? Help Me Find Noise Reducing Windows
Most Of The Windows In My House Are 5X3 Sliders. My #1 Concern Is Noise Blockage, But I Know I Don'T Want To Pay A Ton To Modify My Existing Window Opening (E.G. No Interior Window Build Out). I Am Not Buying Laminate (Too Much For Too Little) & I Don'T Think Using Something Like Soundproofwindows.Com (Again, A Window &Quot;Additive&Quot;) Is What I Want. Window &Quot;Plugs&Quot; Are Also Out. I Need A Real Replacement Window (Pella, Anderson, Etc...) That Blocks Noise Really Well. My Preference Is Vinyl. I Also Am Concerned About The Surrounding Area Around The Windows Where They Connect To Wall. Is There Are Good Insulator, I.E. Some Kind Of Glue Or Foam? I Don'T Want To Overspend, But I Am Not Afraid Of Trying Something That Is &Quot;New&Quot;. I Am Looking For Posts From People That Have Actually Replaced Their Windows, Not Just Internet Search Results That Give Information I Can Find Myself. If You Have Personal Experience With Some Kind Of Noise Proof Window Replacement, Please Help Me Out.

Yikes! I'm afraid you've been given well-intentioned answers but somewhat misleading advice! I will attempt to give you some advice, statistics, and recommendations. I have been in the window industry for over 30 years and will remain neutral as to which brands of windows to recommend (even though you'd like such recommendations) and instead suggest what features you should be looking for.

First, to clear up a major misconception. People assume new double and triple glazed windows will be quieter than their old windows. New double glazed windows could actually be "noisier" than the windows you have. And triple glazed windows will not perform much better than double glazed windows depending on the glass system used. Do not believe someone that says triple glazing is *significantly* better than double glazing when it comes to sound reduction. It's not necessarily true! If each layer of glass is the same thickness (say, for example, a double or triple glazed window with double strength glass), each layer of glass is screening out the same noise frequency because they're all the same thickness and are all placed close to one another. I've even had people comment to me over the years that their new double glazed windows let in more noise than their old single glazed windows that had a storm window. To make a window system block out noise *significantly* better, there are several variables that will help.

1. Laminated glass. This is the single most important variable. When someone buys a window that is specifically designed for noise attenuation (such as if you live near an airport) it always should have laminated glass. If you don't get laminated glass when you're looking for excellent sound-reducing windows, then you've wasted your time and money. My recommendation would be to get laminated glass in an insulating glass unit. Laminated glass is highly effective in reducing noise. It's produced by permanently bonding two pieces of glass together with a tough plastic interlayer between them (like on a car windshield). It also blocks 99.5% of the sun's ultraviolet rays, protecting furniture, etc. from fading. So the outer layer of your glass in the insulating glass would be the laminated glass (usually about 1/4" thick overall), and the inner layer of the insulating glass would be a standard glass (usually 1/8" or so). Most manufacturers offer laminated glass.

2. As mentioned earlier, it's important for the glass layers to be of different thicknesses. Multiple layers of glass with the same thickness are all working to block out the same sound frequencies. If one glass layer is 1/8" thick and one layer is 1/4" thick, the window will be more effective at reducing outside noise because they will be reducing some different noise frequencies. Again, laminated glass is thicker than "normal" glass because it is actually two pieces of glass bonded into one.

3. Spacing glass layers farther apart aids in reducing sound. So a 1" overall insulating glass would be better than a 5/8" insulating glass if everything else is equal. That's why if someone had a single glazed window with a storm window, and that storm was about 2" away from the glass of the single glazed window, it could potentially be better at sound reduction than a modern vinyl double 3/4" glazed window.

4. Air tightness. A super-glass sound-reducing window will not perform well at reducing sound if the window is drafty. It must be installed properly and not allow sound to go around the sash or frame.

5. Insulation. I was glad to see you asked about "the surrounding area around the windows where they connect to wall." Very insightful! A low-expansion foam insulation is great for insulating around the window; it blocks noise, air, and cold. Insulating around the window should not be overlooked.

Incidentally, there is a way to measure sound performance. The ability of a window to reduce outside noise is commonly measured in 2 ways - either via its Sound Transmission Class (STC) or via the Outdoor-Indoor Transmission Class (OITC). The higher the number the better the window is at reducing sound. A noise reduction of 10 decibels represents cutting the noise level in half. So a rating of 25 (which is 2-1/2 times greater than 10) means that the product reduces the outside noise by approx 25 decibels, cutting the noise in half 2-1/2 times, or cutting it by over 80%.

If memory serves, double and triple glazed windows (non-laminated) typically have an STC of about 25-30, while laminated is closer to mid 30s but can be as high as 40. Getting it up to 40 can be pretty costly though.

So to sum this up (it's already getting pretty wordy), look for a laminated glass window (about $100 more with many brands). I wouldn't personally put as much stock in what is said about brand names in the previous posts (even though that's what you asked for, sorry) as I would in the type of glass used. Since your #1 consideration was sound reduction, I would suggest that what is most important is the type of glass used, not what brands others have used in the past regardless of the glass system. Best wishes in 2008!

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